Sunday, 31 July 2011

Donna Franklin & Gary Cass AND the Cotton Crisis

This is amazing! 

There are many reasons as to why I love this link. For a start, it shows promise for finding alternative ways in which to feed our ever-growing demand for resources such as cotton.

They are creating "cellulose cotton" in the laboratory, fit for textile purposes. At the stage in which this film was created, the fabric, like any living organism, had to be nourished and kept hydrated. It demonstrated the possibility of the "commodification of the natural world".

For those who may not be familiar with the cotton industry crisis: 
"Cellulose is the Earth's major biopolymer and is of tremendous economic importance globally. 
Cellulose is the major constituent of cotton (over 94%) and wood (over 50%). 
Together, cotton and wood are the major resources for all cellulose products such as paper, textiles, construction materials, cardboard, as well as cellulose derivatives such as cellophane, rayon, and cellulose acetate."
....this causes a great demand for cotton farming.There are many issues that have arisen from this demand, one most commonly known is that of pesticides, clear risks to the health of those who pick the crop and harvest it and all that relating to the direct negligence to workers including poor pay and exploiting children. Alongside this, there have even been issues of drought caused by governments in poor countries over-farming and abusing their land.

which brings us back to our video....Donna Franklin & Gary Cass
"Imagine a fabric that grows...a garment that forms itself without a single stitch!
The fashion that starts with a bottle of wine...
Micro'be' fermented fashion investigates the practical and cultural biosynthesis of clothing - to explore the possible forms and cultural implications of futuristic dress-making and textile technologies.
Instead of lifeless weaving machines producing the textile, living microbes will ferment a garment.  
A fermented garment will not only rupture the meaning of traditional interactions with body and clothing; but also raise questions around the contentious nature of the living materials themselves.
This project redefines the production of woven materials.  
By combining art and science knowledge and with a little inventiveness, the ultimate goal will be to produce a bacterial fermented seamless garment that forms without a single stitch."
....I came across this a few years ago on another blog. Since the blog post, there was even more information regarding progress. However, since I first discovered this video, there has been no further development, not even a mention in regards to "Global Cellulose" having taken on the project. I really hope this is something that gets put into effect in the next decade!

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